First Round of Student Research Grants Yields Positive Results

| June 13, 2014
Spring recipients of the Provost’s Student/Faculty Collaborative Research Grants recently met with Provost Julian Schuster to talk about their research and to receive certificates recognizing their accomplishments.

Provost Julian Schuster congratulated the spring recipients of Provost’s Student/Faculty Collaborative Research Grants, saying “the initial results exceed all of our expectations.”

Spring recipients of the Provost’s Student/Faculty Collaborative Research Grants recently met with Provost Julian Schuster to talk about their research and to receive certificates recognizing their accomplishments.

“Meeting with the students confirms our hopes and expectations that this grant would enable and empower our students and faculty to share their works with the external community and to enjoy valuable feedback from that community,” said Schuster, Webster’s provost, senior vice president and chief operating officer.

One such opportunity was the inaugural Taking the Lead conference in April in the Sunnen Lounge, where undergraduate students presented their research to the Webster community.

The Student/Faculty Collaborative Research Grant also enabled some students to attend the annual conference of the Midwest Psychological Association in early May. At the conference, students met and shared ideas with their peers and faculty from other institutions. “This experiential learning opportunity exposes students to ideas and applications they may not necessarily receive within the classroom,” said assistant professor Eric Goedereis, who accompanied his students to the Chicago conference.

Student Grant Recipients
  • Michelle Bloyd-Fink (’15), women & gender studies and sociology
  • Melissa George (‘14), international human rights
  • Sarah Graham (’14), biological sciences
  • Jeanette Guellil (’14), international human rights
  • Emily Mason (’16), women & gender studies and psychology
  • Sara McMullin (’14), psychology
  • Ian Simpson (’15), psychology
  • Kayla Theberge (’15), English and psychology

“Going to the conference was a great opportunity to meet famous people who I have quoted in my research,” said Ian Simpson. He and Kayla Theberge presented their research on the perceptions and influence of e-cigarettes on emerging adults.

“Being able to present at a conference not only gave me experience in presenting and public speaking, but it also is helping me prepare for grad school and is something I can put on my CV,” said Theberge.

Sara McMullin also presented her research on the effects of anti-obesity advertisements on adults at the Chicago conference. She graduated in May and is now working in a research lab at Washington University.

Emily Mason and Michelle Bloyd-Fink are working together on a longitudinal study with the organization Rape and Violence End Now (RAVEN) to measure change in the attitudes of men who are taking part in a Batterer’s Prevention Program. They will be travelling this summer to a conference in Canada to present some preliminary findings. Their study will continue through next fall. Assistant professor Don Conway-Long, who was one of the founders of RAVEN, is supervising their study.

Publishing research is another way to receive validation and peer review. Melissa George, who is studying the gender gap and statelessness, and Jeanette Guellil, who is studying social enterprises and activism, are working with their faculty sponsor, assistant professor Lindsey Kingston, to publish their research in peer-reviewed journals. Sarah Graham has devised a study of the effects of prolonged standing. She also hopes to present her findings in a peer-reviewed journal.

“This type of research grant empowers students to follow a project of their interest and their design when the funds are not available through other means,” said assistant professor Mary Preuss, Graham’s faculty sponsor. “It gives students a chance to extend the scope of their research by providing extra funds and possibly extend the amount of time spent doing research.”

“The initial results exceed all of our expectations,” said Schuster, remarking on the success of this first group of grant recipients. “We look forward to further enhancing our efforts to ensure continued success.”

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Category: Faculty, Student Affairs and News

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