UHC Advice: Fitness Dos and Don’ts

WHAT ARE OUR EXERCISE TRUTHS?

 no pain, no gain  — FALSE

Correct Answer: False

Exercise doesn’t have to hurt to help you get in shape. If you’re a beginner, start slowly. A little muscle soreness is normal in the beginning, so don’t let it keep you from exercising. But if you have severe pain, stop exercising until it goes away. If it doesn’t, see a medical professional before you start up again.

WHAT IS THE MOST BALANCED EXERCISE PLAN—WALKING, WEIGHT LIFTING AND YOGA

  • ·Correct Answer: Walking, weight lifting, and yoga

Walking, weight lifting, and yoga would be the most balanced exercise plan because it has three different types of exercise: aerobic/cardio (walking), strength training (weight lifting), and flexibility training (yoga).

All three are important. Aerobic or “cardio” (walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, tennis, basketball) boosts the strength of your heart and lungs; strength or “resistance” training (weight lifting, resistance band exercises, etc.) help to keep your muscles and bones strong, and help with balance and coordination; and flexibility exercises (yoga, stretching, tai chi) can improve your range of motion and reduce your risk for injury.

DO CARDIO WORKOUT BEFORE STRENGTH TRAINING– FALSE

There is no “correct” order for cardio and strength-training exercises — but it may make a difference if you have a specific goal in mind. If your primary goal is endurance, do cardio first. If it’s building strength or burning calories, do resistance training first. This gives your body the energy to focus on your main target.

The most important thing is to get enough of both types of exercise every week.

YOU WILL GET MORE FIT DOING 30 MINUTES STRAIGHT OF EXERCSIE RATHER THAN DOING 10 MINUTE SESSIONS 3 TIMES PER DAY  — FALSE

  • ·Correct Answer: False

The CDC recommends at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity cardio/aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, or some combination of both. It’s fine to spread out your exercise over the course of the day. Stick to a minimum of 10 minutes at a time, though.

Anyone with a medical condition and anyone over the age of 45 should talk to their health care provider before beginning an exercise program.

YOU SHOULD WARM UP EXERY TIME YOU EXERCISE AND COOL DOWN WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED—TRUE

Many people don’t warm up before exercise or cool down, but they should. A warm-up period of light aerobics — slightly raising your breathing and heart rate — can prepare your muscles and help prevent injury. A brisk walk or a steady bike ride for 5-10 minutes – or until you break a sweat — should do the trick.

A cool-down period helps your body recover from the workout. To cool down, simply continue your exercise session but at a lower level of intensity. Include gentle stretching to loosen your muscles, tendons, and ligaments to help prevent soreness and injury

WHAT IS THE TARGET HEART RATE YOU SHOULD AIM FOR WHEN EXERCISING? – 50-85% OF YOUR MAXIMUM HEART RATE

You’ll get the most cardiovascular benefit when you exercise at 50% to 85% of your maximum heart rate.

To find your maximum heart rate, subtract your age from 220. Your target heart rate is 50% to 85% of that number.

To measure your heart rate — or to take your pulse: place your fingers on the artery on your wrist or side of your neck and count the number or beats in a minute. Or count the number of beats in 30 seconds and double it. That is your heart rate.

HOW MUCH WATER SHOULD YOU DRINK BEFORE EXERCISING?—25-28 OUNCES

It’s important to stay hydrated before and during exercise. Remember, it takes a while for fluids to move through your system. Drink about 20 ounces of water two to three hours before exercise and 8 more ounces about 25 minutes before you start. Drink about 10 ounces of water every 10 to 20 minutes during your exercise

WATER IS ALWAYS BETTER FOR REHYDRATION THAN SPORTS DRINKS—FALSE

  • ·Correct Answer: False

Water is usually the best way to rehydrate, especially for most people doing normal, daily exercise. But if you’re exercising vigorously for more than an hour, sports drinks can be just as good — or better. Sports drinks can provide energy in the form of carbohydrates and replace electrolytes lost through perspiration. That helps you perform.

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