Woolf Honored with American Psychological Association Presidential Citation

| August 26, 2014

Webster University psychology professor Linda Woolf received a Presidential Citation from American Psychological Association (APA) President Nadine Kaslow at the organization’s annual convention in Washington, D.C. on Aug. 9. The citation–a rare honor awarded to only about 50 out of 130,000 APA members yearly–commends Woolf for “educating current and future generations about human rights through her scholarly teaching and writing, and for assisting APA in drafting and adopting policy resolutions that prohibit human rights abuses and protect the welfare of individuals in U.S. custody, most notably the comprehensive 2013 policy that reconciled seven earlier APA policies.”

Kaslow personally presented Woolf with the citation at a surprise ceremony at the APA convention. Woolf says she was “quite stunned and honored” by the recognition.

The issue of torture is emotionally charged, and as task force chair, Woolf became “a lightning rod for political angst from all sides of the political spectrum.”

The issue of torture is emotionally charged, and as task force chair, Woolf became “a lightning rod for political angst from all sides of the political spectrum.”

Woolf attended the APA Annual Convention with Webster colleague and fellow psychology professor Michael Hulsizer. Together with Kathleen Dockett, a retired psychology professor from the University of the District of Columbia, Woolf and Hulsizer participated in a symposium titled “Social Responsibility: An Ethical Imperative for the 21st Century.” The symposium discussed the connection between social justice and the field of psychology as well as the need to incorporate explorations of social justice issues in the psychology classroom.

Woolf and Hulsizer also made a poster presentation titled “Teaching the Psychology of Political Violence: Genocide, Torture, and Terror” that provided fellow educators with ideas and resources for tackling the subject of political violence with college students.

The theme of social responsibility echoes in the work for which Woolf received her presidential citation and in each of the presentations with which she was involved this year at the APA convention. “As psychologists,” she explains, “we not only endeavor to teach the science of psychology but also how that knowledge can be used to make the world a better place–a more socially responsible place. Social responsibility is so key to our profession that it is one of the primary learning outcomes, as defined by the American Psychological Association, for the undergraduate psychology degree.”

Read more at the College of Arts & Sciences blog, Global Thinking.

 

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  1. Meg Sempreora says:

    Sincere congratulations, Linda, on your fine work and your recognition.
    Meg