Snapshots: Anheuser-Busch Foundation Native Plant Rain Garden Dedication

| October 29, 2013
The Anheuser-Busch Foundation Native Plant Rain Garden, dedicated Oct. 28, 2013

The Anheuser-Busch Foundation Native Plant Rain Garden, dedicated Oct. 28, 2013

The occasion was to celebrate a “rain” garden, but the weather offered only clear skies and sunny warmth as more than 100 guests of Webster University and Anheuser-Busch gathered Monday afternoon outside the East Academic Building to dedicate the Anheuser-Busch Foundation Native Plant Rain Garden.

Speakers included Webster University trustee Tony Thompson; President Beth Stroble; Provost Julian Schuster; Margarita Flores, vice president of community affairs for Anheuser-Busch; and Lindsey Heffner LaFore, a Webster alumna and current graduate student who has been active in sustainability efforts on campus.

The deans of Webster's five schools and colleges with President Stroble at the Anheuser-Busch Foundation Native Plant Rain Garden dedication

The deans of Webster’s five schools and colleges with President Stroble at the Anheuser-Busch Foundation Native Plant Rain Garden dedication

They were joined by faculty, staff, students and special guests representing community partners like the Urban League, Who’s Who, the American Red Cross, the YWCA of Metropolitan St. Louis, Casa De Salud, and SWT Design, the firm that designed the garden and is headed by Webster University alumnus Jim Wolterman (MBA ’90).

On behalf of Anheuser-Busch, Flores praised the purpose and design of the rain garden, which won the 2012 St. Louis Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects Merit Award.

The rain garden is a sustainable alternative for storm water management, capturing rainwater and filtering it via the native plants before it is returned to the groundwater. The natural process keeps contaminated rain water out of the storm water system and absorbs rainwater runoff.

Prominently situated between the Community Music School and the south entrance to the East Academic Building, the garden is visible to guests entering what has become the local community’s main entrance to campus when attending events at the University’s Community Music School, the Rep, and Opera Theater of St. Louis.

Schuster, Flores, Thompson and Stroble after the unveiling of one of two monuments marking the occasion. It reads: Native Plant Rain Garden Made Possible Through the Generosity of The Anheuser-Busch Foundation.

“We are truly excited about our future with AB as a partner in St. Louis and around the world,” Stroble said, calling it “a future where we will continue to work together to educate responsible global citizens, mitigate our impact on the environment, and have a positive impact on the communities we serve.”

Anheuser-Busch is a longtime supporter of Webster University and other local institutions. Since 1997, Anheuser-Busch and its foundation have invested more than $490 million in local communities through donations to charitable organizations.

The garden is “a visual reminder of the importance of sustainability in our world and on this very campus,” Schuster said. “The Anheuser-Busch Foundation’s very significant support of this feature serves as a message to our students.”

“It is very reassuring, as a student and alum, to know responsible companies understand our global need for change,” Heffner LaFore said. “Partnership is essential in facilitating this change.”

Schuster cited this and other initiatives such as the Global Internship Experience, where Anheuser-Busch and Webster have worked together as, per the theme of the day, “Partners for a Better World.”

View more photos from the event in this album on Facebook.

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Category: Advancement, Campus Snapshots, Webster News

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